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Lostine River, OR -The Wallowa Mountains

The Wallowa Mountains are a mountain range located in the Columbia Plateau of northeastern Oregon in the United States. The range runs approximately 40 mi northwest to southeast between the Blue Mountains to the west and the Snake River to the east. The range is sometimes considered to be an eastern spur of the Blue Mountains. Also called the “Alps of Oregon” Much of the range is designated as the Eagle Cap Wilderness, part of the Wallowa–Whitman National Forest. The highest point in the range is Sacajawea Peak, at an elevation of 9,838 feet above sea level. The Wallowa Batholith is formed of granite from a magma upwelling in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time (between 160 million and 120 million years ago)

Most precipitation in the area is orographic precipitation. Near the tops of the mountains, total annual precipitation can exceed 100 in per year, as opposed to 10 in in the valleys. The Lostine River is a tributary to the Wallowa River draining northwest from the north side of Eagle Cap.

Before this trip Matt King had dialed in a few rivers in the Wallowa’s and after a cross-country road trip, back home for 8 hours, I was on my way to the Lostine with Jacob Cruser. We met up with Tygh and Matt and headed to the river.

The put in. The last calm pool you will see.
The put in. The last calm pool you will see.

 

After the put-in the Lostine tilts on edge and the whitewater begins. A lot of blind turns and consistent gradual gradient goes until the first long boulder garden.

The long boulder garden on the Lostine River

 

The last couple rapids build into vertical walls with an intimidating rapid to exit the gorge and reach the take-out. After ducking a log-jam and catching an eddy on river left, you can see the take-out eddy downstream on river left…in between is the exit crux. This section can be seen from the take-out bridge. Scout well and have fun. The Lostine as well as the greater Wallowa’s are packed full of adventure.

 

Log ducking before the final rapid.
Log ducking before the final rapid.

 

Tygh cruising into the take-out
Tygh cruising into the take-out

 

The Lostine was an instant classic with easy access, flat water put-in shortly followed by non-stop action. The character starts out with fast paced shallow boulder gardens that eventualy forms into a bedrock gorge before the take out bridge.

For video on the Lostine River and a couple other Wallowa Classics, check out this edit by Jacob Cruser

 

Flows: Flows are hard to catch in the Wallowas, but the best time is the spring/summer run off when the rivers slowly drop into a good flow range
Take-out: High bridge on Upper Lostine Rd.
Put-in: About 4 miles up the rd. near the first calm pool.

Multnomah Creek, OR

Multnomah Creek is a beauty. A steep and classic example of the ruggedness of the Pacific Northwest. The falls drops in two major steps, split into an upper falls of 542 feet and a lower falls at 69 feet. It is also the most visited tourist attraction in Oregon, having over 2 million visitors each year. The trail leads past Multnomah Lodge and across Benson Bridge acceding to the upper portion of the creek.

Multnomah Falls durring a winter scout
Multnomah Falls durring a winter scout

There are many smaller falls upstream as you ascend the creek. Hidden Falls and Weisendanger Falls marks a potential put-in if you are going to explore with your kayak. In the early 2000’s a group of paddlers made the first descent on Multmomah creek (Trip Report can be found on Oregonkayaking.net) putting in below Weisendanger and paddling down to Mutlnomah and taking out well before the 600ft. horizon line. A couple years later a group of paddlers went up to run Weisendanger, To my knowledge one person claimed the first desent before another paddler suffered a minor injury and the group left. With the amount of tourist activity at the base of the creek it is next to impossible to hike up the trail with your boat on your shoulder without being asked a million questions (Mostly if you are going to to run off Multnomah Falls). I was stopped by park rangers on my first attempt (They said it was illegal) so I turned around and left to go figure out a better way in. That better way was only due to not being seen, but the trail was a little more difficult. Ely Pyke, Josh White and I did a little warm up on lower Bridal Veil then drove over to Wahkeena Falls and hiked up the trail to Larch Mountain then made our way over to Multnomah Creek and dropped in on Hidden Falls and Weisendanger Falls. Ely ran Weisendanger twice that day while Josh and I looked on with excitement. On the second run Ely said he hit something pretty hard on the landing after over rotating a bit. The waterlevel was a little low and the more water the better for this falls. After the excitement we hiked down the trail to the parking lot. We didn’t get as many questions on the way down as you do on the way up… If you really want to run this section of whitewater be careful and plan ahead. I’d put this one on the Mission Impossible list unless you are willing to hike in the back way, but even then it is well worth the adventure.

Wahkeena Falls, scouting the back way in
Wahkeena Falls, scouting the back way in
Wahkeena Trail from Wahkeena Falls over to Multnomah Creek
Wahkeena Trail from Wahkeena Falls over to Multnomah Creek

Flow: The flow in Multnomah Creeks comes from underground springs from Larch Mountain. Spring snow melt (rain on top of snow) is best for peak flows.

More pics of the whitewater coming soon…

Other whitewater nearby Multnomah Creek, OR

Lower Bridal Veil Falls

Middle Bridal Veil Falls

Eagle Creek

Middle Bridal Veil Falls, Oregon – ‘Cable Choke Falls’

On Feb. 13th I came across a photo on-line that looked very interesting. A large falls, not far away which looked very runnable in the photos. I sent out an email to Luke Spencer titled “Why have we not looked at this?” The subject of the message was Middle Bridal Veil Falls. Only a half mile off the historic highway, it is one of the lesser known waterfall tourist attractions. That fact alone makes it more intriguing and seemingly more untouched.

Middle Bridal Veil Falls is located near the end of a narrow canyon about a half mile up from the Historic Highway on Bridal Veil Creek. It has a trail up to the base of the falls and access up Palmer Rd. to the top of the canyon. If you want to be in the pool below it then you have to hike up the creek from the bottom and not the rd. Much like the Lower Bridal Veil Falls this one has remnants of the old logging operation that went on through this creek bed in the late 1800’s up to 1937 when the mill burned.

As curious waterfall hunters do, Brett Barton and I set out on foot heading up the creek to find the falls.

Middle Bridal Veil Falls
Middle Bridal Veil Falls
Scouting the top of the falls
Scouting the top of the falls

It looked great, top to bottom, we just couldn’t see the face of the falls, head-on, or the pool up close and we were out of time for the day. So I sent out a few messages and Friday Feb. 19th we met just after a few days of rain. The creek was the same level as the previous scout and soon we were all facing the falls and all of it’s hidden beauty. This angle showed some of the hidden concerns of running the falls. Brett, Tony, Luke, Andrew, Keel and I inspected the face of the falls as close as we could. On the previous trip we saw a large cable draped from the lip of the falls to the opposite ridge. On this trip we saw a cable that had been severed and is now hanging down the center of the falls. Concerns about debris in the pool complicated matters and most of us decide we wanted to come back at lower flows to inspect the pool closer. Tony, however liked it as is and we decided to gear up and go up to the lip of the falls.

Middle Bridal Veil from the bottom
Middle Bridal Veil from the bottom
Second scout - concern with the cable in the falls.
Second scout – concern with the cable in the falls.

 

Tony at his last view point before testing the falls
Tony at his last view point before testing the falls

The put-in had its own challenges as well. It was a steep hike down using ropes and as we scanned for a place to secure a boat for a put-in we were forced to use a tiny eddy not far from the lip of the drop. Tony was still interested so we pushed the boat up to the river wide log and carefully placed the boat on the other side so he could drop in. It is an intimidating put-in this close to the lip of the falls, sitting in a moving eddy that drifts into the current and straight off the jagged lip of the falls. Tony got ready, pulled out of the eddy moving right, rolled off the lip and went into his tuck. Seconds later he was looking back up at the falls with a big smile. Despite the shallow looking features at the lip, he said he didn’t touch anything but water on his line. In the parking lot before we all left Tony dubbed the falls ‘Cable Choke’.

Tony Skirv dropping in for the first time
Tony Skirv dropping in for the first time

On March 7, Brett, Keel, and I returned with Nate and Heather Herbeck, Trevor Sheehan, and Johnny Ott to attempt the falls again. After meeting the cloudy skies cleared and we had a little sunshine to start the day. Half of us went to the top while the others started the slow hike upstream. The hike down is steep with loose rocks here and there. I had to set my boat down and work my way to the closest tree to the water, still about 30ft. off the water. Then I noticed, out of the corner of my eye, an unexpected loose rock tumbling and gaining speed down the hill up to my right.  It crashed into the side of my boat and sent my  boat and paddle launching off the cliff and into the creek below me. Everything was collected quickly and we focused on the task at hand.

Climbing down to the put-in...
One last look before dropping in…

Once we were at the lip of the falls we wasted no time. The falls and the line looked better than ever and I got in my boat with Trevor’s help, took a minute to clear my head and paddled out of the back of the eddy. The line felt great, read and run class 3 lip straight into free fall… to re-connect to landing. At the top Brett held Trevor’s boat while he got ready. Trevor came off with a nice line and landing resurfacing downstream of the landing zone. We celebrated at the bottom and headed back to the cars. Another successful day in the land of waterfalls here in the beautiful Columbia Gorge.

The put-in...
The put-in…
My line, falling fast...
My line, falling fast…

* Editor’s note; The main Tourist attraction “Lower Bridal Veil Falls” just off the historic Highway has two tiers (Two parts) to it so I have always called the upper tier “Upper Bridal Veil” and the lower tier “Lower Bridal Veil”. In actuality, they are both considered “Lower Bridal Veil Falls”. Cable Choke is technically “Middle Bridal Veil Falls” and “Upper Bridal Veil Falls is another impressive waterfall further upstream than the Middle Falls.

There has been a proposal for a trail to be built (Details Here) that will allow easier access upstream. For now if you want to reach Middle Bridal Veil Falls hike upstream at water level until you reach the base of the falls, If you want to go higher up the creek it’s easier to take Palmer Rd up the creek to scout.

Log Flume downstream of Middle Bridal Veil Falls.
Log Flume downstream of Middle Bridal Veil Falls.

Other whitewater nearby Middle Bridal Veil Falls

Lower Bridal Veil Falls

Eagle Creek

Herman Creek