Tag Archives: Little White Salmon River

Little White Salmon River, WA

For anyone, the pure beauty of the place is enough to make you want to go back time and time again. Fortunately for paddlers, the most efficient way to see this magical place is from a whitewater kayak. Since 1989 paddlers have been pushing the limits of what is possible in a kayak right here on this river. It is the perfect training grounds for class V paddling. Whether that is personal achievements or paddle technics that are passed on to another paddler and carried to another river or just finding new and dynamic lines that push the progression of whitewater kayaking in general. This river has it all! Easy access, short shuttle, boulder rapids, falls ranging from 10 to 33ft., and a canyon deep enough that it stayed clean of the industrial boom of dams built in the Columbia River Gorge.

The put-in is at the first bridge that crosses the river, on the other side of the river from the USGS Lab in Cook, WA. Just downstream from Willard. A 15 minute warm up on class 3 rapids abruptly ends at the top of Gettin’ Busy.

Gettin’ Busy sets the stage for the Little White. This rapid tests you awareness for what’s to come. If your a little rusty, Gettin’ Busy will let you know just how much. The rapid starts with the Oregon Slot, created in 2007, after a log jam flushed into the first rock drop (entry rapid) to Gettin” Busy.

The Oregon Slot atop Gettin Busy
The Oregon Slot atop Gettin Busy

Since the first log jam more wood has collected year after year forcing paddlers into a narrow channel on the left that requires some technical low water rock paddling in order to not get pinned on the way through the slot.

The top of Gettin Busy, have fun!
The top of Gettin Busy, have fun!

 

Todd Anderson ducking logs in Gettin Busy as Jason Shroeder looks on
Todd Anderson ducking logs in Gettin Busy as Jason Shroeder looks on

 

The variation of lines that you can run in there is mind-boggling. There are many channels, most are good, some are not, but know where you are going in there before you drop into anything. Gettin’ Busy leads straight into Boulder Sluice.

Boulder Sluice durring the making of Haymaker
Boulder Sluice durring the making of Haymaker
Rob Bart taking flight at Boulder Sluice
Rob Bart taking flight at Boulder Sluice

 

This is one of the best high speed, late stroke, take flight lines on the river. Read and run class III leads around the corner and filters through a cluster of rocks above Island Rapid. There is always wood in this section somewhere as well as the river wide log that has been wedged at head hight for the last two years, scout on the right. Island comes up quick…

Keel scouting the new wood in 2007

 

 

 

 

 

Island. The right side around the island used to be a good alterative (sneak line) to running the main line at higher flows, but wood has collected there in the past couple years. The left line (Main Island) is fast and steep with strong laterals.

Looking back up at Island Rapid
Looking back up at Island Rapid

 

Todd Anderson in the runout below Island – 2007

 

Read and run class IV leads into a set of ledges ending in Sacriledge, a sloping ledge drop with a perfect curling green tongue in the center. Sacriledge, like a few rapids on this river, has a cave up against the left wall at the base of the falls.

Chris Leach on Sacriledge
Chris Leach on Sacriledge

 

At higher flows a rescue and gear retrieval becomes slim to none under the walls. Downstream is Double Drop, a sloping double ledge falls dropping about 18′ together. At higher flows the top hole can pack a big punch.

Keel Brightman lining up on Double Drop

 

In the run-out to Double drop is a fast paced curling left reaction wave called Typewriter. Read and run class IV leads down to the Enchanted Forest (right side of the island) above S-turn. The left side of the island (sunny side) can be run as well and it has a sliding bedrock character opposed to the boulder garden character of the right side. The left side is also the faster race line at proper flows.

Log ducking on the Left side of the Island around the Enchanted Forest

 

S-turn is a complex rapid, it drops about 12′ off a vertical shelf into a turbulent pool that pushes left and into a tight slot backed up by a powerful hole.

S-Turn down the center line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The unnerving part is that the powerful hole is backed up by a pocket cave in the left wall where most of the water pushes. Scout this one very well. The right side is commonly run in order to stay away from the left wall at the exit. This is a great place to take a break at nearly the halfway point.

Boogie water leads down to Backender. This double ledge rapid had wood blocking 90 percent of it forcing you to go had right against the wall. In the last couple years the massive boulder in the middle of the river rolled downstream and the logs are completely gone opening up another clean and classic rapid.

Backender down the middle, wide open
Backender down the middle, wide open

 

Around the corner boogie water leads into Bowey’s Hotel, a boxed in ledge hole on the left. (Named after the legendary Bill Bowey). This hole can be more powerful than it looks.

TA clearing Bowey's Hotel
TA clearing Bowey’s Hotel

Just downstream everything slopes into Wishbone Falls and splits the river with the left channel opening up and plunging into a deep emerald pool.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The right channel of Wishbone has been run a few times, but is currently full of wood.

Dropping into the middle of the left channel, Wishbone Falls
Dropping into the middle of the left channel, Wishbone Falls

 

You are now in The Gorge where the water flows into a narrow pinch below Wishbone.

The Gorge aka The Narrows
The Gorge
aka The Narrows

 

Three ledge drops and Horseshoe ledge make up the narrow section. Horseshoe can get retentive especially at higher flows with Stovepipe not far downstream.

Looking back up at Horseshoe and the Gorge from Stovepipe

 

As the canyon opens up it flows over Stovepipe. Stovepipe pours off in three channels with most of the water going down the center of the falls then against the left wall into a dangerous undercut. The right side offers more paddle strokes and avoids the undercut wall.

Down the main line at Stovepipe
Down the main line at Stovepipe

 

Todd Anderson riding the center line at Stovepipe with perfection
Todd Anderson riding the center line at Stovepipe with perfection

 

Right line at Stovepipe
Right line at Stovepipe

 

 

Around the corner is Contemplation Canyon (The only piece of flat water on the run) which drains into some really fun waves and off of the Ski Jump. Spirit Falls is just downstream. Out of all the photos and video you have see of this drop nothing compares to seeing it for your first time.  Spirit pours off about 33 feet into the cauldron below. The Spirit Falls and Chaos combo is one of the best sets of rapids I have ever run. Chaos is a tricky 8ft. ledge with a nasty keeper hydraulic against the right wall.

 

Spirit
Spirit

Devin Morton paddling hard off Spirit Falls
Paddling hard off Spirit Falls

 

Always watch for new wood
Luke Bradford and Arron Johnson on the left portage at Spirit Falls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below Chaos is rapid that contains a lot of logs against the left wall. It looks inconspicuous, but stay to the right and away from the logs. More read and run leads down to the backwards ledge (go with a local..) then down to Master Blaster. One last bang before the Little White lets up.

Keel Brightman taking the right line at Master Blaster
Keel Brightman taking the right line at Master Blaster

 

Master Blaster has several lines, the most common is down the left, staying left of the big boulder. Immediately below Master Blaster are a series of concrete weirs. Be aware of these at higher flows they create terrible hydraulics! At the end Drano lake calmly brings you down and back to your car. What more could you ask for?

Dropping into Drano Lake off the last set of weirs
Dropping into Drano Lake off the last set of weirs

 

Corey, AJ, and Jarred paddling across Drano Lake after a fun run
Corey, AJ, and Jarred paddling across Drano Lake after a fun run

 

For a look at the history of the Little White CLICK HERE…

Flows: The water level is measured at the put-in on the gauge stick under the bridge on the river left side. The bottom of the stick reads about 2.7ft. which is in the low range. From there up to about 3.2ft is the low end. From 3.2 up to 3.8 is a good medium flow (Note that at about 3.6ft you start to feel a solid push from the river). 3.8ft and up is in the high range. About 5 years ago not many paddlers put on above 4.5ft. Since then the top paddlers in the sport today have been pushing the levels up as high as 5.2ft. The river becomes a different animal above 4.0ft. Be very careful at high flows.

The gauge stick at the put-in with water at the base (about 2.6ft)

 

Spirit and Chaos at high flows
Spirit and Chaos at high flows

The Little White Salmon River is located in the crosshairs of the Cascade Mountains and the Columbia River. Extreme winter conditions occur during the start of the season. Beware of ice in and along the river. If you know the run it can take less than an hour to run. If it’s your first time without a guide it could take all day. An easy way to start remembering rapids in there is to memorize the lead-in rapids. Every major rapid has a lead-in rapid.

Sometimes it's safer to stay in the river and off the banks
Sometimes it’s safer to stay in the river and off the banks

A brief look at the Little White Race 2008

The Little White Race 2008 was a tough 2 days of racing! Saturday was the down river race from the top of Gettin Busy to the pool below Wishbone Falls. Sunday was the Giant Slalom at Boulder Sluice Rapid. 7 Gates set up by John Grace, Austin Rathmann, and Erik Boomer made up a very tricky section! Two runs totaled together, and combined with the previous days time made up the overall score. Here are a few shots from the weekend courtesy of Keel Brightman Photography.

Geoff Calhoun leaving the starting line, more than 15 minutes of racing from here to the end!

Jono Ramsey making the move at gate # 4

Todd Anderson making his way through the last few gates

Todd taking a post race free fall while Geoff watches from below

Nick Urquhart on Spirit Falls

Joe Stumpfel airing it out, C-1 style!

Check out LVM Video for results, more on the Little White Race 2008, and more of the Giant Slalom Races.

Little White Salmon River, Washington

The Little White Salmon River, located in Skamania County in south central Washington, drains approximately 134 square miles and flows out of the Monte Cristo Range. It originates in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and drops south for 19 miles into Drano Lake in the Columbia River Gorge. The section of river between The Willard National Fish Hatchery and Drano Lake is arguably one of the best class V day runs in the country. In the late 1980’s Bob Coombs was among the first to explore the river and as the interest with the Little White grew more paddlers put on and picked their way down the run. The next year, 1990, paddlers such as Ron Reynier, Bill Bowey, Jeff Bennett, Phil Unsworth, and Bill Pooley were running it on a regular basis and picking off the unrun rapids one by one. By 1992-93 other paddlers such as Charlie Kirsch, Cal Diller, Elizabeth Tarr, Roger Stewart, Ron Blanchett, Jed Weingarten, and others were getting the run dialed in while Bowey, Weingarten, and Unsworth were pushing the limits of higher water levels. By mid 1993 all the rapids had been run with the exception of Stovepipe and The Big Falls. Stovepipe was run by early 1994 and that just left the ‘The Big Falls’. At this point paddlers were starting to refer to it as ‘The Altar’ :an elevated place or structure, as a mound or platform, at which religious rites are performed or on which sacrifices are offered to gods, ancestors, etc. Since no one ran drops that big back then ‘The Altar’ fit the final drop on this run as paddlers would take in the beauty and make their way around it on each trip, but that reference didn’t last long. Weingarten had broken his boat on the run and stuffed a log in the cockpit and sent it off as a probe. It had a great line off the Altar, then one week later local paddler Jens Mullen decided to solve the last piece of the puzzle and after running it he named the big drop Spirit Falls and it properly fit.

At this point the paddlers who have seen Spirit Falls in person are fortunate individuals as Spirit was the site for the proposed dam on the Little White Salmon River. They passed it by since they had a maximum depth of 800 feet for any proposed dam sites in the tributaries of the Columbia Gorge, the canyon depth at Spirit is just under 1000 feet. This awe inspiring lower canyon on the Little White has been declared eligible for the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, but never put on that list. The review done by the Forest Service states that “Opportunities for solitude are excellent with very few signs of humans to distract the recreationist. Due to difficult access, this extremely interesting area exists today in much the same condition as when Lewis and Clarck passed through the Columbia River Gorge.”

Roger Stewart in the Gorge @ 1992
Photo Ron Reynier
*notable comments from the early days:
Ron Reynier: “It was that following year, 1990, that we figured it out top to bottom. I can vividly remember how we got beat down figuring out Getting Busy before finally understanding the run.”
Jeff Bennett: “To put all that in perspective, I learned to paddle the LWS in a 12′ long Prijon T-Slalom, then a Dancer XT…. and those were cutting edge.”
Jed Weingarten: When I got back to my boat, it had a big crack in the hull. So, I found a big log, stuck in the cockpit, and sent the boat off to see what would happen. It had a sweet line off of the Altar, but broke into 3 separated pieces in Chaos (which hadn’t been named yet either!).

*and according to early sources, Wishbone Falls was run down the right channel during the first few times that paddlers decided to drop into the lower gorge. Since then paddlers have stuck with the left channel.

The crew below Stovepipe, summer 2007
Photo: Keel Brightman

Jay Gifford running Stovepipe in early 2007

Tristan McCleran running Chaos at 3.6 feet early 2007
Photo Erik Boomer

*a few recent notable descents:
*Todd Anderson and Tommy Fredricks running the right channel at Wishbone Falls in early 2006.
*Ross Henry and Todd Anderson throwing some of the biggest free-wheels I’ve seen off of Boulder Sluice Rapid in early 2007.
*Frequent runs at 4.8feet by the local crew in 2006-07′
*Todd Anderson free-wheeling Stovepipe in 2007.
*L.J Groth’s free-wheel off Spirit Falls in 2006 – same day as the race.
*Locals runing car (put-in) to car (take-out) in under 40 minutes.
*Highest known complete descent by Erik Boomer in 2006 at 5.0 feet.

Thanks to Ron Reynier, Jeff Bennett, and Jed Weingarten for the early history and all the Photographers for the photos.